This Woman Shares Her Sleepwalking Adventures On TikTok – And The Results Are Hilarious

Celina Myers rarely gets a restful night’s sleep. And you only need to look at her night vision security cameras to understand why. Through the grainy footage, you can just about make out the Canadian, who gets up to the strangest things in the small hours of the morning. Even Myers has no idea what she’s doing when the cameras are on, and the shocking videos have made her something of an internet sensation. You won’t believe your eyes!

Myers is a sleepwalker, you see. And it was one very, very embarrassing incident that made her start posting her adventures online. Yep, while Myers was staying in a hotel, she came around in the middle of a subconscious stroll. But much to her shock, she was no longer in the confines of her own room, but out in the corridor, of all places! After ambling back to her room, the young woman realized that she’d locked herself out. It gets worse. Trust.

Thankfully, Myers had thought to pick up her phone on her way out of her hotel room – even if she did forget some arguably more important items. Turning on the camera, the Canadian quietly screams as she explains her situation. “I am naked!” Myers admits on the recording, making sure the lens doesn’t stray too far from her face and neck.

Yes, Myers had managed to fall asleep, start sleepwalking and get locked out of her room all while in the buff. And now the only way back in was with help from the staff at the front desk. She made her way downstairs completely starkers. Rather her than us!

Before reaching the lobby, Myers fortunately found a way to cover herself. She told BuzzFeed News in January 2021, “There [were] like these two chairs. I took the two cushions, and I put one on the front and one on the back. I was really close to the front desk, and I kind of just put my head around the corner.” The staff helped her get back into her room in what must have been a very uncomfortable few minutes.

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Most people probably would have shied away from sharing such a story with their friends, let alone with the internet-at-large. But Myers knew that she had found her internet niche as soon as she had posted the sleepwalking clip on TikTok. “I saw how much people loved it, and I was like, this is our full-time job, we’re home,” she said. And it may be hard to believe, but her sleepwalking exploits have only gotten crazier. Lucky for us, they’re all on camera.

Yet Myers didn’t set out to become TikTok famous for her sleepwalking pursuits. The Ontario, Canada, native self-published a slew of supernatural novels, which she sold by the thousands. And she also used to host a podcast called The Haunted Estate. Plus, according to BuzzFeed, she’s also a beauty entrepreneur. But it’s her social media presence that really rocketed her to stardom.

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At first, though, Myers took a while to find her groove on TikTok – the platform that now garners her a massive number of followers and views. She started by doing the same as most of the other content creators, posting funny skits as well as clips of her trying out the app’s latest trends.

Eventually, she came up with a new idea for her content – and it all stemmed from a condition she had dealt with from a very young age: sleepwalking. Myers, her brother and her mother had all sleepwalked from time to time, and the TikToker could clearly remember what happened the very first time she did it.

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Myers told BuzzFeed News, “I think the very first time I was about four years old, and my mom asked me where I was going in the middle of the night, and I was like, ‘I’m going to see Mom.’ And she’s like, ‘I am Mom, go to bed.’”

Over time, Myers came to realize that certain foods triggered her sleepwalking episodes: chocolate and cheese, specifically. And it was a combination of those two ingredients that led to the sleepwalking escapade in the hotel. You know, the one so crazy that she whipped out her camera to record the aftermath? Just remembering it makes us cringe. The support online was probably worth it, though, eh?

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While staying at the hotel, Myers made the fateful choice to order dessert. She said, “I got the midnight chocolate cheesecake that they had, didn’t even think of it.” The combination of ingredients triggered a sleepwalking incident that’s so shocking it’s almost unbelievable. That’s if it hadn’t been caught on camera, of course!

That video, which is the first of Myers’s sleepwalking chronicles, garnered 5.3 million likes and more than 72,000 comments. Most people expressed the same sentiment of shock from watching the TikToker’s video. One summed it up by writing, “This is amazing but oh, my God.”

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While Myers’s sleepwalking habit may seem unique, experts have realized that it’s a pretty common condition. For instance, a study published in the scientific journal Neurology in 2012 revealed that 3.6 percent of American adults sleepwalked annually. And this equates to about 8.4 million people.

On top of that, researchers found that nearly 30 percent of the U.S. adult population recalled having sleepwalked at least once in their lives. Before then, experts believed that only 2 percent of the population had personally experienced the condition. And so the updated findings prove it happens quite a lot.

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Although this research sheds a bit more light on the prevalence of the condition, it did not answer the main question about sleepwalking: why do people do it? Well, experts still don’t know exactly why it happens. But they have realized that it tends to run in families, just as in Myers’s case.

And they also understand that certain triggers can make sleepwalking episodes much worse. People who feel stressed or anxious can be more prone to taking mid-sleep strolls, for instance. Or those who have drunk too much alcohol or taken a new medication or drug might start moving in the middle of the night, too.

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Most people who suffer from the condition will get up and onto their feet during the deepest part of their nightly sleep cycle, or the non-R.E.M. part as experts call it. This typically occurs either early in the night or closer to the time when a person wakes up. Either way, sleepwalking can be pretty dangerous for all those involved.

If you happen to see someone sleepwalking, the best thing to do is to make sure that they are safe. You should keep windows and doors shut, for example. “If at all possible, gently try to steer them toward their bed,” professor of neurology Dr. Gayatri Devi told WebMD. “If they resist, let them be,” he added.

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Most sleepwalking incidents go off without a hitch, and the person on their feet will either wake up or make their way back to bed. And in the morning, they’ll probably have no idea about what happened the night before, either. Unless they’re like Myers, of course, who’s had cameras installed all through her house.

Myers began inducing sleepwalking – presumably by noshing on her trigger foods – and recording her exploits with overhead security cameras. And she made a huge splash with the clip that she posted on January 22, 2021. Even in the dark, the cameras manage to capture the hilarious mission that the TikToker found herself on while mid-dream.

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In the video, Myers walks through her living room with arms full of what appear to be soda cans. She then makes her way out of her house and into her snow-covered front yard. She tosses the tins onto the ground, then returns indoors to gather more drinks and do the same. It makes no sense until you read the sleepwalker’s caption, which explains, “I remember dreaming about a pool party.”

Perhaps the funniest moment of all is when a neighbor walks in front of Myers’s house as she’s throwing her cans into the yard, maniacally laughing as she goes. The neighbor is wearing a jacket with a fur-lined hood, so it’s hard to see their face. But they turn to look at the sleepwalker a few times, and it’s clear they’re confused by and perhaps even concerned about what’s happening.

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Myers later explained the dream that prompted her to act this way in her BuzzFeed News interview. She said that, in her head, her snowy front yard was actually a pool filled with gelatin, and her fellow internet celebs had come by for a party. Myers said, “I know that David Dobrik was there, with all the influencers that I really like. It was really weird. I remember throwing things into the jello pool, like it was really weird.”

In a February 2 clip, Myers’ husband Adam sleeps on the couch as she makes her way into the living room. Sensibly, he’s always close by when she intentionally triggers her sleepwalking. In the video, Myers audibly says the word “Salt,” then goes to grab the container from the kitchen. But the video’s caption explains that she actually grabbed a mayo jar, which she places on the floor in the middle of the room.

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Next, Myers gazes off into the distance and appears to be in a staring contest with a duck figurine that stands on top of her bookshelf. Perhaps the avian creature beats her, though, because she then extends her pointer finger at it respectfully. By now, her self-chats and sound effects have woken up her husband, who merely chuckles at her from his perch on the sofa.

Her escapades eventually come to an end, but only after she waddles across the living room with her laundry basket in hand. Obviously, this nonsensical string of sleepwalking events delighted Myers’ fans. As of February 18, it garnered 16.9 million likes and more than 330,000 comments.

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But Myers hasn’t just brought in her husband to hilariously costar in her videos. In footage shared on January 16, she introduced a fellow sleepwalker to make things even more interesting. Yes, as you’ll recall, the TikToker wasn’t the only one in her family who deals with the condition.

Myers’ brother Joel stands behind her as she explains the concept for the video to come. And she even claims that he’s worse than her when it comes to sleepwalking. To prove it, the siblings would nosh on their mutual trigger food, cheese, and then go to bed – hoping to wake up for some mid-snooze antics.

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Then the clip switches to black-and-white footage, making it clear that the presleep helping of cheese had, indeed, worked. Myers sits at her kitchen table, staring off into space as Joel wakes up on the couch. He unfurls the blanket around him, holds it in his hands and says, “I’d like to return this sweater, please.”

Joel then takes the blanket and puts it on his sister’s lap. Myers looks down at the throw, her eyes clearly beaming even in the night-vision footage. She then exclaims, “Wow,” although she is presumably looking at her own comforter that she lent to her brother in her waking hours.

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Next, the footage jumps to Myers sitting in the same chair, but she has turned it to face her brother. She then shouts, “Hut! Hut! Hut! Hut” and extends her arm in the air. She suggests to Joel, “Let’s shake on it,” although it is unclear to what the pair have agreed.

Perhaps it had something to do with snacking, as Myers next offers her brother a treat. “Do you want a sandwich?” she asks him. Joel responds with a resounding, “Yeah!” But rather than heading to the kitchen, the pair stand and stare at the living-room bookshelf. You can see why viewers just can’t get enough!

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Myers’ brother features in some of her other videos, including one that she did to commemorate reaching ten million followers on TikTok. In a clip from February 5, 2021, she explains how she “wanted to do something big” to mark the occasion, but she “didn’t want it to be about [her].” Because her husband doesn’t want any big or exciting gift, either, she gave her brother his dream vehicle, a BMW motorcycle.

Obviously, building a huge audience on TikTok – she has 13.1 million followers, as of February 18, 2021 – has had its benefits for Myers. Not only could she gift her brother with a top-of-the-line motorcycle, but her husband, Adam, was able to quit his day job. And he now works with his wife to create content for her still-burgeoning social media presence.

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Of course, Myers has also reaped plenty of rewards from her newfound TikTok career. She told Love By Life in January 2021, “My followers have changed my life in such a wonderful way. I’ve spent so many years so sad and so sick. My husband and I have suffered so many losses… So they really lead me. They helped me understand that I never had a reason to give up.”

Not every message to Myers post-TikTok fame was one of support, though. The web creator told BuzzFeed News that lots of people believed that she had faked the footage of her sleepwalking exploits. And while she confirmed that everything was “100 percent real,” she added that knowing there were doubters made her feel “anxious” about sharing snippets of her late-night romps.

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Myers said she was even shocked by what she saw sometimes. She explained, “It doesn’t look believable sometimes, and even when I watch it back, I’m like, I can’t even post this because people are gonna think this is staged, and I hate that, I think that because I want to show every single minute of it because I find it so funny.”

Ultimately, though, Myers has soldiered on because her videos bring joy to others. She said, “I saw that it would bring people smiles, and I was like, I’m gonna roll with it…” Plus, the TikToker added, setting herself up to sleepwalk didn’t hurt her. “If I don’t eat cheese and I don’t eat chocolate after dinner, I have nothing to worry about.”

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That is, of course, until she starts sleepwalking – and transforms into the unpredictable version of herself. Myers sees the woman in the late-night video clips as someone who’s “a little aggressive,” which is totally unlike her real-life demeanor. But we think we speak for everyone when we say we’re excited to see what her spirited alter-ego gets up to next.

Even if you’re not a sleepwalker like Myers, you may still be suffering from restless sleeps. If that is the case, don’t worry: there’s a home remedy that experts simply swear by. Yep, they say the benefits that come from sleeping with a bar of soap under the sheet are nothing short of miraculous. Don’t knock it until you’ve tried it!

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Yet it isn’t known exactly how the crazy health hack works – nor is there any hard science to back up the claims of those who swear by the trick. But nevertheless, the home remedy has countless loyal followers who supposedly cozy up with bars of soap at night to alleviate their ailments.

Among the people to recommend the remedy is TV doctor Mehmet Oz and advice columnist Ann Landers. The latter even claimed that her readers “were thrilled and grateful to be liberated” by the effectiveness of the trick. And it seems that Landers’ fans aren’t the only ones to be convinced into sleeping with soap.

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According to an online poll from The Doctors, you see, 42 percent of respondents testified that sharing their beds with soap really did improve their sleep. But the remedy doesn’t simply help people to drift off at night; rather, its uses are quite specific.

Before we discover the purported health benefits of sleeping with soap, though, let’s look back a little at the history of home remedies. It all began in ancient Egypt, it seems, when honey was used to tackle high blood pressure. Cider vinegar has also been utilized as a medicine for generations and was once even believed to be the “fountain of youth.”

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In more recent times, too, chicken soup has gained a reputation for being a home remedy for a common cold. Plus, gargling salt water is said to bring instant relief to a sore throat. Honey and lemon has long been touted as a homemade antidote for a cough as well.

In the past, though, home remedies were often passed down through generations or spread through word of mouth. Since the advent of the internet, however, various alternative cures have gained wider traction. And what’s more, many of them have proved so popular that they’ve achieved viral fame thanks to social media.

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For instance, one home remedy that found online fame claimed to be an effective cure for sunburn. It seemingly all started with Texas-based mom Cindie Allen-Stewart. Apparently, Allen-Stewart had often experienced painful sunburn no matter how much sunscreen she’d applied. And she’d reportedly tried a number of remedies to soothe her skin – until her mother-in-law stepped in with the ultimate hack.

Oddly, though, Allen-Stewart was seemingly told to apply shaving foam to her sunburn. Revealing the trick on Facebook in 2018, the Texas native explained, “It has to be the foam, and it has to have menthol in it.” And while the health hack may sound unusual, Allen-Stewart swore that it “works wonders,” adding, “It takes the heat out of it fast and makes it more comfortable on you.”

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Revealing how to correctly apply the supposed sunburn remedy, Allen-Stewart advised others to put “the shaving cream on the burn.” She added, “It may seem like it’s a strange shaving ritual, but trust me! Don’t rub it in, just let it sit on your skin. It will start bringing all that heat out – you’ll be able to feel it. You may feel like you are itchy too, but that’s a good thing! Itching means healing.”

Allen-Stewart also advised that after half an hour – or when the shaving cream has dissolved – you should wash the residue off. She suggested repeating the process the following day, too, claiming that a second treatment will cure any sunburn completely. And she’s so convinced by the hack that she’s apparently been using it for ten years – even on her children.

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It seems that Allen-Stewart’s passion for her shaving foam sunburn cure rubbed off on others too. Since she posted about the trick on Facebook, in fact, the message has been shared more than 230,000 times and has clocked up over 43,000 reactions. Her post also attracted thousands of comments – some from people who could attest to the hack themselves.

One such comment beneath Allen-Stewart’s shaving foam hack post read, “This works amazing! With aloe [vera], you have to keep putting it on, and it doesn’t help for very long. But the menthol shaving cream stopped the burning feeling after the first use permanently, and after the second I hardly feel the sunburn.”

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But sunburn isn’t the only ailment that the internet claims to have a cure for. In April 2019, for instance, one mom’s purported health hack went viral after she claimed that it eased her daughter’s itchy chickenpox symptoms. And just like Allen-Stewart, she couldn’t resist sharing the helpful trick on social media, either.

The mom in question is Clare Jenkin from East Lothian, Scotland. And she had apparently been at her “wit’s end” after her daughter Reagan had contracted a nasty strain of chickenpox. As a result, Jenkin took the tot to see a doctor – and the medical professional seemingly had some surprising advice on how to ease the little one’s itchiness.

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According to Jenkin, the doctor told her to use anti-dandruff shampoo as a home remedy to soothe little Reagan’s skin. And seemingly to the concerned mom’s surprise, the health hack worked a treat. So much so, in fact, Jenkin wrote on Facebook in April 2019, “Anyone who’s kiddies pick up chickenpox, I cannot recommend this enough.”

Continuing her post, Jenkin explained, “Reagan went to the docs today, and we were advised to use Head & Shoulders Classic as a bubble bath to soothe the spots. The difference is unbelievable! Over an hour without a single scratch or moan! No more angry red spots. Hopefully this helps anyone else who’s at their wits end with scratching children.”

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Jenkin included images of Reagan’s chickenpox symptoms alongside her post. She also later returned to Facebook with an update on her daughter’s condition, saying, “Started using the shampoo suggested on Thursday… Saturday night’s update after another bath! Almost all spots dried up.”

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Jenkin’s home remedy for chickenpox seemed to resonate most with fellow parents whose own children were suffering from the ailment. Her post has since been shared over 164,000 times and clocked up 44,000 comments – many of which came from people who’d reportedly had success with Jenkin’s shampoo hack.

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Commenting beneath Jenkin’s post, one happy parent wrote, “My 15-month little girl has chickenpox this week, and I have bathed her every other night in Head & Shoulders Classic, and the difference is crazy. Her spots have dried up, and she’s stopped crying because she’s itchy… and it’s a bonus I was able to wash her hair as she had chickenpox on her scalp.”

Another person added, “Used this [on] my son this week… Amazing! Why has this never been discovered before? [I] have two older kids who have suffered and only had calamine lotion available, which in my opinion is the devil [as] it dries to powder, and powder makes you itch more.”

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So it’s safe to say that the internet is awash with rumored home remedies. And what’s more, many of them apparently stem from ordinary people who’ve shared their health hacks on social media. However, one strange-but-simple trick that was reported in 2017 seemingly had the approval of at least one medical expert.

In fact, the hack in question had appeared on The Dr. Oz Show in 2010. The series is fronted by Mehmet Oz, a doctor who rose to prominence as a guest on The Oprah Winfrey Show. The doctor graduated to his own show in 2009, and his TV fixture unsurprisingly focuses on health and medical issues.

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The Dr. Oz Show has enjoyed much success too. An article in the The New Yorker even claimed that the series was “among the most highly rated daily television programs” in the U.S. Furthermore, the show has won nine Daytime Emmy Awards during its decade-long run.

Needless to say, then, Oz’s expert medical opinion is valued by a large number of his viewers. So he no doubt raised a few eyebrows during one episode in 2010 when he advised certain people to sleep with bars of soap under their bed sheets. Yet it seemed that there was a method behind the madness.

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That’s because the soap that Oz was referring to wasn’t any old bar. In fact, the doctor insisted that only a bar made from lavender should be used. And according to the doctor, the bathroom product is a “crazy home remedy” for restless legs syndrome. This disorder is generally worse when the sufferer is resting, so it can result in sleep problems that, in turn, can cause further health complaints.

People with restless legs syndrome experience – as the condition’s name suggests – a strong impulse to move their legs. The disorder may also be characterized by unpleasant sensations in the lower limbs that improve with movement. And because the feelings tend to happen when a person rests, sleeping can become a challenge.

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As a result of their disrupted sleeping patterns, those with restless legs syndrome may feel sleepy during the daytime. They may also suffer from irritability, a lack of energy and low mood. Furthermore, many patients with the long-term disorder may experience twitching limbs while they sleep.

So bedtime can clearly be a battlefield for people with restless legs syndrome. According to Oz, however, lavender soap could offer sufferers some relief. Speaking on a 2010 episode of his eponymous show, the doctor said, “I know this sounds crazy, but people put it under their sheets.”

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Explaining why the soap might help to alleviate restless legs syndrome symptoms. Oz added, “We think the lavender is relaxing and maybe itself beneficial.” While the TV personality encouraged his viewers to test the hack out, though, he only had anecdotal evidence that the trick works. That’s because there are no medical studies to suggest that lavender soap can help with the disorder.

But that being said, Oz isn’t the only person to claim that people’s health could improve if they sleep with lavender soap. The Ann Landers advice column has recommended the practice as a cure for leg cramps on numerous occasions, in fact. And apparently many readers were “thrilled and grateful to be liberated” from the ailment on account of the trick.

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Most people will actually be familiar with the discomfort caused by nocturnal leg cramps. The involuntary contractions of the muscles can strike without warning, though, waking sufferers with a painful jolt and making it difficult for them to drift back off to sleep until the twinging subsides.

But it seems that sleeping with lavender soap may offer relief from nightly muscle contractions as well. According to a Twitter poll by The Doctors, in fact, 42 percent of respondents believed the bathroom item prevented nocturnal leg cramps. The show’s experts failed to find any scientific support to back up the assertion, however.

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Furthermore, Dr. Kim Gladden advises that lavender soap is not the answer to nocturnal discomfort – because leg cramps can be caused by a number of factors. These include issues with nutrition, side effects from medication, overexertion or simply a lack of stretching.

If you do endure nocturnal leg cramps, though, the first thing that Gladden suggests is reaching for water rather than lavender soap. In an article on the Cleveland Clinic website, Gladden said, “If you are experiencing cramping, it’s important to look at your hydration first. You want to make sure you are drinking enough water throughout the day.”

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Alternatively, Gladden said, making sure you stretch each day could help alleviate nocturnal leg cramps. As Gladden explained, “You want your muscles to be as strong and supple as they can be. Adequate stretching after a brief warm-up period is key to this.”

And even though leg cramps can strike in the middle of the night without warning and disrupt a sufferer’s sleep, they are nevertheless reportedly nothing to worry about. As Gladden explained, “They tend to happen more frequently as we age. While they can be uncomfortable, they are rarely harmful.”

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So while the scientific community is seemingly on the fence about the benefits of sleeping with lavender soap, the home remedy has plenty of fans elsewhere. And people are so passionate about the hack that there’s even advice to avoid certain brands, such as Dial and Dove. Although the size, packaging and placement of the soap tend to vary from person to person.

Consequently, those who swear by sharing their sheets with soap have reported success whether they’ve used a massive bar or a mini, hotel freebie. It also doesn’t seem to matter whether the product is wrapped up or not – or if the affected leg is placed over the soap. On top of that, there’s also no real clue as to how the hack actually works.

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It may be that the lavender soap itself is not a cure for leg cramps and that the benefit of sleeping with a bar could purely be in the patient’s head – meaning that it has a placebo effect. If you suffer from nightly muscle spasms, however, there seems to be little harm in trying the unusual health hack. Though you should probably check with a doctor if symptoms persist.

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