People Can’t Explain The Ghoulish Figure In This 100-Year-Old Photograph

When Belfast Live published a series of century-old photographs, lovers of the paranormal virtually had a field day. In fact, the Northern Irish news website was probably unprepared for the influx of traffic that would eventually come from eager ghost watchers – all fixated on one spooky snap. Yes, hidden among the photos was an image that seemed to feature an unexplained, ghoulish presence. And this strange vision is chilling enough to make almost any skeptic start believing.

The photograph in question was taken back in 1900 and shows a group of ten young women at a linen mill, all dressed for work. At a glance, the image is rather benign, giving us a small insight into what life was once like for these girls at the turn of the 20th century. Upon more rigorous investigation, however, the snap reveals something altogether more disturbing.

And the staff at Belfast Live later claimed that they had been oblivious to the photograph’s creepy nature when they were putting the collection together. This was only realized after a relative of one of the snap’s subjects got in touch with the site. Lynda was the granddaughter of one of the women pictured, and she had a hair-raising admission to make.

Lynda was naturally pleased to see that her grandmother Ellen Donnelly featured in the picture, but she also had something else to share. You see, the original photograph, Lynda claimed, was still in her father’s possession. And, rather creepily, Ellen’s relative would label the snap “a family ghost picture.”

In her letter to Belfast Live, Lynda even explained exactly where people needed to look in the “ghost picture” to see the supernatural. And after the site ran a new story pointing out the terrifying presence that Lynda had highlighted, the spooky photograph soon began spreading around the web.

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To begin with, though, the folks at Belfast Live had uploaded the image for a more benevolent purpose. The original story including the spectral snap had been written by Mark McCreary and published on the website in April 2016. And this feature had opened by mentioning how modern technology has changed the retail industry. McCreary used the rise of online shopping to illustrate that very point.

The author also highlighted how self-checkout machines had taken away the human interaction of being served by a shopkeeper at the cash till. But, of course, such tech hasn’t always been with us. And McCreary wanted to evoke those days gone by, in what he called a “time… when services came with a personal touch.”

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So, the pictures accompanying the piece present a way of life that’s almost unrecognizable by today’s standards. McCreary explained some of these old snaps, writing, “Our gallery includes great old images of delivery men using a horse and cart – and their own broad shoulders – to bring milk, [potatoes] and coal to houses across Belfast.”

These photographs were actually taken across several decades – from the beginning of the 20th century right up to the 1950s. And as British historians may know, Belfast was known for producing ships during the earlier part of this period. The most famous of these, of course, was the RMS Titanic, which infamously sank in 1912, condemning over 1,500 passengers to an awful fate.

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Along with the significant shipbuilding sector, Belfast was also home to numerous linen mills. According to the National Archives of Ireland, in fact, the city once produced more linen than anywhere else on Earth. And these mills served as the workplaces of a large number of women, with Ellen Donnelly – who, remember, is in that spooky image – having been among them.

Naturally, other sorts of businesses grew throughout Belfast at the time. There were factories producing cars, tobacco and ginger ale, for instance, as well as engineering works. A variety of smaller firms and stores could be found throughout the city, too.

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Bakeries, grocery stores and launderettes all flourished in Belfast at the turn of the century and beyond. And then there were the more specialized enterprises that may seem rather quaint to us today. One particular company, called Gribbon Bros., was involved in the making of handkerchiefs. Yes, you read that right.

But the retail industry in Belfast wasn’t without its darker side. In reality, children often took employment at points in their lives when they should’ve been learning at school. There were apparently some 2,000 kids working in linen mills at the beginning of the 1900s, with others acting as deliverers and salespeople.

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And the images published on Belfast Live give us a fascinating glimpse of day-to-day life in that period. In one photograph, for instance, young boys are being handed copies of a newspaper. Naturally, one could safely speculate that it’s down to these kids to deliver these papers around the city.

Another photo dating back to July 1932 shows female employees at work. They’re busy at the Gallaher Factory, where they can be seen preparing boxes of cigarettes. And the sheer number of women packed onto this factory floor gives a sense of the operation’s incredible scale.

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Elsewhere in the collection, a shot from around 1915 shows a number of men digging up a road. That feat is arduous even today. And we can only imagine how difficult the process must have been without the help of any of the modern machinery that construction workers now have at their fingertips.

In another snap, men can be seen rolling large barrels along the ground, preparing them for transport. This shot was taken at Dunville’s Distillery, which specialized in the production of whiskey. And, yet again, the photo shows us how much more physically demanding such a system must have been without the help of current-day technology.

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In fact, all of the photographs in the gallery shed light on the way that things used to be for Belfast’s workers. But there was one shot in particular that would capture the imaginations of plenty of people – and for a chilling reason. This image, of course, is the one featuring Donnelly and her colleagues.

Yes, while the photo nicely functions as a window into the past, it became famous for another reason entirely. And while at a glance, things in the picture seem to be normal, there’s actually something lurking behind Donnelly. Horrifyingly, there appears to be an additional, terrifying presence in the shot – maybe even a ghost.

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Naturally, belief in spirits or ghosts is nothing new. And even though there’s no scientific basis for their existence, many people are still convinced that we experience visitors from another realm. According to a 2009 Pew Research Center study, 18 percent of people in the United States have claimed that they themselves had encountered ghosts.

Supposed apparitions have long turned up in photos, too. One well-known example is a 1936 image purported to have been taken by a photographer from the publication Country Life. The spooky snap apparently depicts a ghost – the so-called Brown Lady of Raynham Hall – standing on a staircase in Norfolk, England.

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The Brown Lady is thought to be the spirit of a woman named Lady Dorothy Walpole, whose brother was U.K. Prime Minister Robert Walpole. Born in 1686, she went on to marry a man called Charles Townshend, who was known for his brutal outbursts. And, reportedly, after discovering that his wife had cheated on him, Townshend locked her away in Raynham Hall, where she is later thought to have died in 1726.

Then, over a century later, Lady Walpole’s spirit supposedly appeared to people during a Christmas gathering at Raynham Hall. According to one Lucia C. Stone, a pair of guests at the property claimed to have witnessed the figure dressed in brown traveling en route to their bedrooms. And the following day, the specter was apparently seen in more detail. Chillingly, a witness went on to explain that the vision had only holes where eyes should have been.

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But Lady Walpole’s ghost apparently didn’t rest after that, as in 1836 she is said to have materialized in front of a man named Captain Frederick Marryat, Marryat’s daughter Florence later detailed her dad’s alleged encounter, writing in 1891, “I have heard [my father] describe how he watched [the ghost] approaching nearer and nearer… [He] recognized the figure as the facsimile of the portrait of ‘The Brown Lady.’”

Captain Marryat’s daughter Florence continued the description of her father’s experience with the ghost. She went on, “He had his finger on the trigger of his revolver and was about to demand [the ghost] to stop and give the reason for its presence there, when the figure halted of its own accord before the door behind which he stood… Holding the lighted lamp she carried to her features, [she] grinned in a malicious and diabolical manner at him.”

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But the Brown Lady of Raynham Hall is just one of countless ghosts claimed to have been captured on film. Many more photos have been widely circulated over the years – all said to feature unexplained spectral presences. And in 2016 Belfast Live unwittingly published yet another image to add to this lore.

At a glance, there’s nothing particularly notable about the photograph of the female staff. Just like the other pictures in Belfast Live’s collection, it offers a small but charming insight into the life of 20th-century workers in the city. And as we mentioned, in this particular case the image focuses on women from a linen factory.

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In fact, when the photo was published along with 15 others as part of the Belfast Live feature, no one at the website initially noticed anything odd. But when one of the site’s readers wrote in to comment on the image, it would never be seen in the same way again.

That reader, as we revealed earlier, was Lynda, who contacted Belfast Live to explain that she was the granddaughter of someone in the photo. She wrote, “Great to see an old photo of my granny… when she worked at the mill. She was Ellen Donnelly – née McKillop – and she is fourth on the right in the second row down.”

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Lynda continued, “I don’t really believe in ghosts, but there have been a few odd going-ons around this photo, so I hope this doesn’t cause any more!” She added, “Did anyone spot the mysterious hand on the girl on the right’s shoulder?”

Yes, if you look carefully, a mysterious hand seems to be draped over one of the women’s shoulders. Strangely enough, though, this appendage doesn’t appear to be attached to anyone. And as everyone standing around the hand has their arms folded together, it couldn’t really belong to any of them, either.

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Predictably, internet users have been having their say on the ghoulish-looking hand in the photo. And while there were those who simply labeled the pic as “creepy,” others were more measured in their responses. Writing in the comments section of a feature on the Daily Mirror’s website, one reader even elaborated on their own theory.

“Photo manipulation existed before Photoshop,” the individual wrote. “One of the most common types was composite photos – basically what would now be described as ‘Photoshopping someone in.’ There were various techniques for this, including double exposure or making a pasted mock-up print to photograph and manipulate when printing that photo in the darkroom.”

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This same internet commenter also pointed out that there was a problem with some shadows in the Belfast Live snap. They added, “If you look at the image of the girl with the hand on her shoulder, the shadows on her in the image do not fall at exactly the same angle as those on the faces of the other people in the image.” This, the person implied, hints at the fact that the photo had been manipulated.

Meanwhile, in the comments section of the Belfast Live article, a reader put forward another plausible explanation for the ghostly vision. And, apparently, the unidentified hand in the photo may not have resulted from a purposeful editing job after all.

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This person explained, “As late as the early 20th century, exposure times for portraits were often at least several seconds long. So, the subjects had to stand very still, or a double exposure or blurring would result. One explanation might be that the woman [on the] top right had her hand on the other woman’s shoulder at the beginning of the exposure, and then she quickly moved to a folded-arms position when she realized the exposure had started, creating a double exposure.”

And then there was the Belfast Live commenter who believed that the hand had not materialized because a ghost had appeared in shot – nor had it appeared as the result of some camera trickery. Instead, they argued that the vision had been created simply because of the way in which some fabric was positioned.

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As this skeptical individual put it, “It’s just the dress on her shoulder. If you look at the ‘fingers,’ they are actually the dress material. It’s just the way it fell. If the lady behind her had moved her arm, it would be clearer. Sorry to burst your bubble. It has a natural explanation and not a supernatural one.”

It wouldn’t be the first time that photos allegedly depicting ghosts have been explained by other means. In fact, many folks over the years have been outed as frauds for producing pictures that fake bizarre phenomena. But even so, snaps that supposedly depict the paranormal still get people talking – on the internet and beyond.

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And when it comes to the photo of the Belfast linen workers and the ghostly hand, maybe we should draw our own conclusions. After all, few would argue that the pic isn’t at the very least to be considered creepy. So, is it really the result of the supernatural – or just something much more mundane? Well, it’s up to you to decide…

While you’re at it, you can make up your own mind about Mabel Chinnery’s now-famous snap of her husband. That, too, seems to show a strange specter in the back of a car – and that hair-raising vision has been speculated upon for several decades now. But is there really a ghost in shot, or could there be a more mundane explanation?

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It’s March 1959, and Mabel Chinnery is heading back to her car in Ipswich, England. Then, once she has returned to the vehicle, she takes a casual snap of her husband Jim as he sits in the front seat. The scene is normal – banal, even. But once the shot is developed, Chinnery notices something chilling. There’s an eerie figure in the back seat – and it looks rather familiar, too…

The spooky discovery had rounded off a tough few days for Chinnery, as her mother, Ellen Hammell, had passed away only a week before the photo was taken. Then, after the funeral, she had traveled to the cemetery to take some photos of her parent’s plot – meaning, of course, that she’d had a camera on her.

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These photographs – including the one of Jim in the car – were later sent off to be processed. But it was only while Chinnery was showing the results to a friend that she noticed the creepy figure. Yes, it looked like someone else had been in the vehicle with her husband at the time – but Chinnery knew that the two had been alone.

And, upon closer inspection, the friend believed that the mysterious figure was actually Chinnery’s recently departed mother. In the shot, she seems to be sitting in the back on the passenger’s side, with Jim behind the steering wheel. Indeed, there appears to be a face in the gap between Jim’s head and the pillar of the car door.

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Chinnery knew, too, that her mother had preferred that side of the car when she was sitting in the back. And Jim confirmed this years later, when the couple both appeared on a 1985 edition of the TV show Arthur C. Clarke’s World of Strange Powers.

On camera, Jim revealed that Chinnery’s mother had habitually favored that part of the vehicle because she had wanted to look at him as they spoke. But that wasn’t the spookiest part. According to the Englishman, Hammell’s very last words to Jim before she died had been “You’ll never come to any harm ’cause I’ll still be with you.”

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To this day, experts and lovers of the supernatural analyze the snap, hoping to explain just how Hammell – or someone who looked like her – managed to materialize in the car. And it’ll probably be no surprise to hear that, in the decades since it was taken, the spine-chilling photo has become internationally famous.

A few weeks after Chinnery had taken that photo of her husband, her tale was featured in the U.K.’s Sunday Pictorial newspaper. The image was included as well, giving readers a glimpse of the mysterious figure. And it didn’t take long for U.S. media outlets to pick up on the spooky story.

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Unlike the Sunday Pictorial, though, the newspapers in America didn’t have access to Chinnery’s picture. Then, a couple of months later, readers in the U.S. finally got the chance to look at the shot – and come to their own conclusions – after Parade magazine featured the image in a June 1959 edition.

The Parade article went into detail about what had happened in Ipswich, too. And, crucially, the magazine also printed an older shot of Hammell while she was still alive – allowing people to carefully compare and contrast the features of the “ghost” with those of Mabel’s late mother.

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Chinnery told Parade, “I decided to use up the rest of my film [in the camera] by taking a picture of my husband in the car. When I showed the developed picture to friends, one said, ‘But there’s your mom in the back.’” So, was there really an apparition of Hammell in the photo, or did the strange sight have a more conventional explanation?

Well, in cases like this, the appearance of a ghostly figure could be all down to a simple operating error. When using a camera containing film, you need to move the roll along before snapping a new photo. If you don’t, there’s a chance that the previous picture will bleed into the shot. This is referred to as “double exposure.”

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One of the experts who examined the picture back in 1959 wasn’t so sure that this was a simple example of double exposure, though. And when speaking to Parade, they had a compelling explanation – suggesting, perhaps, that the photo was indeed a snapshot of a supernatural phenomenon.

The anonymous specialist said, “The lady in the back [of the car] can’t be the result of a double exposure. If it were, the door’s upright wouldn’t block off part of her face. And she can’t be a reflection in the window, either.” Others have analyzed the image, too, hoping to determine the truth behind the mysterious vision.

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For example, Arthur C. Clarke’s World of Strange Powers brought in two experts to look at the image – and determine once and for all whether there was really a ghost in shot. And Dr. Steve Gull and Tim Newton’s professional experience should have made them ideal for the task in hand.

As they used computer software to break down photographs, you see, the pair were apparently often asked to look at pictures involved in ongoing investigations. And Gull and Newton analyzed four different images for Arthur C. Clarke’s World of Strange Powers – including, of course, the photograph that Mabel had taken.

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Newton and Gull duly scanned the snap and uploaded the results to their computer. Then, with their software, the experts were able to zoom into the area where Hammell was “sitting.” And from there, they went on to notice a couple of unusual details.

For starters, Gull and Newton picked up on a strange “bump” inside the car on the left-hand side of the photo. And while to the naked eye there doesn’t appear to be anything in that space other than the empty seat, the area next to the door pillar seems to show a shape that resembles a shoulder.

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This simple detail cast the photo in a new light, as it appeared that Hammell’s body shape didn’t line up. Instead, it was suggested that the bump could have been part of another chair in which she’d previously sat. And Newton and Gull highlighted something else that indicated this was a case of double exposure.

The specialists focused on the collar of Hammell’s outfit and noticed that there was a slight overlap with the car’s door pillar. Once again, that suggested that an older picture of Mabel’s mother had somehow combined with the shot of the vehicle.

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Gull was certainly convinced of this when he offered his thoughts to Arthur C. Clarke’s World of Strange Powers. He explained, “Some mistake has happened here. Some very short exposure some time before has been superimposed upon the picture of the car.” And the expert wasn’t the only one to question the validity of the supernatural theories.

A writer named Melvyn Willin was similarly skeptical after examining the picture for his book Ghost Photos. Summarizing his thoughts, he wrote, “In this case, the possibility of a double exposure must be considered. On the right is what at first seems to be the door pillar of the far side of the car, but isn’t it much too far forward?”

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“Aren’t the windows too big, and does the curved right side look like a tree trunk?” Willin added. “The supposed mother’s figure looks unnaturally close to the front seat and couldn’t be sitting on the back seat. Even Mr. Chinnery’s face seems too big.” It’s an intriguing argument, but paranormal website Anomalies offers a rebuttal.

The site refers back to Mabel’s claim that she’d been snapping photographs of her mother’s grave before capturing the shot of Jim. And Anomalies argued that if the famous snap was a case of double exposure, Hammell should have cropped up in some of the previous images, too.

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Anomalies also questioned the double exposure theory from another angle. If the vision of Hammell had indeed come from another photo, then her body wouldn’t have been obscured by either Jim or the door on his side. The website similarly noted that the image lacked a tell-tale “second background.”

But you may still be wondering whether there’s a plausible explanation for what happened back in 1959. Was it really a case of double exposure? Or did Hammell really appear from beyond the grave? Well, perhaps Blake Smith’s findings will sway you one way or another.

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Smith has spent much of his life trying to unravel the mysteries behind supernatural phenomena, and that led him to conduct a thorough investigation into the Ipswich image in 2015. To begin with, he took a closer look at the old Parade report.

Then Smith found out the make of Jim’s car, since, as he later wrote for Skeptic magazine, he hoped to “get a better idea of how the vehicle was arranged inside.” In his 2015 post on the publication’s website, he also shared a more recent picture of a black Hillman Minx captured in a near-identical position to the original shot.

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From there, Smith looked over Newton and Gull’s conclusions before putting forward his own theory about the picture. The writer said, “I think the most likely scenario is that Mrs. Chinnery took a photo of her mother in an armchair shortly before the old woman died.”

“Then, with the same roll of film in the camera, [Chinnery] accidentally took a second shot of her husband without forwarding the film to the next frame,” Smith added. So, he was firmly in the double exposure camp. And, ultimately, he speculated that an Eastman-Kodak Brownie may have been used to create the image — as some reports had mentioned that particular make.

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To finally put the matter to bed, Smith contacted Chuck Baker, a connoisseur of the vintage camera. And Baker would reveal just how double exposure would have been possible on a Brownie – as well as users could have avoided such an error.

Baker said, “[The manual protection] had a little slide that would manually be slid over the actual exposure trigger, or a toggle type switch that did the same thing. The user would have to remember to slide [this] over so that [the photograph] would not be double exposed by the photographer or by mishandling.”

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Baker also told Smith that “automatic protection” was possible – even though it was a rarer option. So after clearing that up, Smith then questioned whether double exposure was a simple error to make regardless of a photographer’s experience. And, crucially, the camera specialist claimed that it was indeed “very easy.”

Baker explained, “I’ve made it a practice to always wind to the next frame [on a Brownie] so [that] the camera is always ready to use. What occasionally happens is [that] the lever gets tripped when putting the camera in a bag or pocket. Then when it’s taken out, the new shot is made over the mistaken lever trip.”

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So, after taking all of that on board, Smith believed that Mabel could have made an error of some sort as she prepared to take the shot. Nonetheless, he also understood why she may have believed it was a supernatural event; she had been grieving her mother’s recent death, after all.

And Smith even accepted that his double exposure theory could be rebuffed if Mabel had indeed taken additional photos at the cemetery. He wrote, “If this tidbit is correct, then an accidental double exposure scenario becomes a convoluted scenario. [It would have involved] rolling the film forward to the last frame, taking a photo of the mother-in-law, rewinding the film, taking the whole [roll] of shots, forgetting that the whole ‘last frame’ accident took place and then shooting the new photo of the car over the old photo of the mother.”

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Yet Smith refused to acknowledge the supernatural alternative. He said, “If this detail about the previous shots of the grave could be confirmed, I would think it less likely that the double exposure was accidental – not more likely that the image showed a ghost.”

Then, only 24 hours later, Smith came back to clarify his thoughts in the comments section beneath his post, which had already amassed a few replies from the website’s users. And in his follow-up message, he decried the idea of somehow verifying paranormal activity using photos.

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Smith’s comment read, “I’m not certain that this is a double exposure. I am convinced that the image shows signs of being a composite — and [I] don’t know how that could be accidental if the previous images were taken at the graveside. [But] it looks like a composite image to me. There are other ways a composite image could’ve been made besides double exposure.”

And Smith concluded, “There are always overarching issues in trying to use photography to ‘prove’ anything. No one’s proven that ghosts exist. That doesn’t stop people from being haunted, and it doesn’t stop them from seeing ghosts in a variety of images. But science doesn’t recognize ghosts as a physical reality, and photography won’t be the mechanism by which that might ever change.”

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